Thursday Doors, November 3

This post includes a trattoria, a tomb, a door guardian and the fear of doors.

Yesterday I saw a funny photo from Via Appia Antica in Roma and realised that I never posted the second part of the doors encountered on our lovely April walk.

While the first part of the doors was posted on my first blog, on this one I showed you a lovely exhibition of sculptures that we encountered on our way including a girl on a swing in midair.

The walk was a long one but very pleasant.

This is one of the oldest roads in Roma. These stones were laid there in 312 B. C.

And so we were walking as in a little historic fairy-tale and then we reached the final destination, the tomb of Caecilia Metella, the daughter of an important man and the wife of a wealthy man, with the Caetani Castle attached. Special thumbs up for the windows, guys!

As for the door – it had a guardian, you see. He might have been a leaning lenient kind, but a guardian nevertheless. And even when he disappeared, I was overcome by a certain fear of passing through. (Truth be told – one had to pay to enter.)

Photo: a © signature mmm production

For Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors challenge.

Advertisements

28 Comments Add yours

  1. dennyho says:

    MMM, this collection of photos is awesome! I feel I have been on a trip this morning. Thanks for the tour, happy Thursday to you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah, Denny, that’s the idea and why I do it! It makes me happy, thank you!

      Like

  2. joey says:

    The door you feature on the left is my favorite. It’s like that door has everything. Gorgeous.
    But they’re all good, you never fail at doors or light. I love so many gates. Beautiful.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. joey says:

    (I also liked the part about your shyness and the gate and the prison and all that, but it’s early and I’m just now finishing cuppa coffee #1 so I totally forgot to type that.)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hihih, Joey, you can type at your own sweet pace. I’m glad I’ve chosen your favourite door to feature. 🙂 Wishing you a most excellent weekend ahead.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. joey says:

        Oh thank you! You too! 🙂 The weekend seems so far away on this dark and rainy Thursday morning.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Norm 2.0 says:

    It must be the romantic in me that makes me think the light is overall much better in Italy 😀
    Great shots and as usual I had lots of fun joining you on this doorscursion.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Norm. I think it’s the fact that it’s much easier to take better shots in this light over here. It caresses everything it touches. Especially when the golden hour is about to strike, as in these photos.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I love the doors on the left, and am glad I found your blog!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Katie, good to be found. 🙂

      Like

  6. I like the green gates and that fifth shot, but I enjoyed all of them. I especially enjoyed walking on the ancient Roman road. Such wonderful builders.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Such wonderful builders indeed, Janet! 😀 Thank you!

      Like

  7. jesh stg says:

    This is what I call romantic brick work:) Love the featured door.But more romantic is the Wisteria hanging above the door, and the ivy winding itself around the gate. The Romans became as corrupt as the USA (at this moment), but we have to thank them for the concept of paved roads:):) Lovely post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jesh, thank you! Well, it was part of war machinery, the roads. This way they could invade faster.

      Like

      1. jesh stg says:

        Yes, that’s what our school history books told us too:) In that, the Romans (Italians) have changed a bit over the centuries!

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Dan Antion says:

    Thanks for bringing us another collection of wonderfully historic and beautiful doors!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re always welcome, Dan!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. You’re forgiven for not entering the courtyard, Manja. The rest of your lovely photographs made up for it. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hihi, thank you, Jean! 🙂 Next time for sure!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. door guardians are all about…more than once i have had the suspiciously asked question “what are you doing?” as I took a photograph of door…i guess maybe i look like someone casing the joint. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hehe, I’ve been in Italy for almost four years now and still haven’t realised that here nobody gives a damn what I am photographing. 😀 In this case he obviously wished to be in the frame… 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Fine pictorials of your exploration with a finer narrative in your captions!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Gordon! 🙂 I’m glad you enjoyed it.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Joanne Sisco says:

    I can’t help but wonder …. Italy is SO FULL of treasures, ancient ruins, and interesting architecture, are Italians blasé about it? … is it all just a ‘so what?’ to them because they see it at every turn?
    I look at these photos and just sigh. Those ruins just boggle my imagination. I get excited about something 150 years old. You’re looking at stuff that’s dated BC. I have trouble wrapping my head around that!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are boggled in the right direction, Joanne. Imagine – every time the National electro company starts to dig somewhere in Rome, they WILL unearth some sort of remains. And then they need to stop working and call experts and get authorisation. If the state of Italy should fund research of every little piece somebody encounters, they would go bankrupt. So yes, blasé is correct. Even huge Etruscan metropolises are discovered by accident. Who know what else is hidden in there?

      Like

      1. Joanne Sisco says:

        I’ve heard the ‘horror’ stories of trying to get something built in Rome. So many Italians just want to get on with it – what’s one more ruin? Wow – a case of excess riches!

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Candy says:

    These are great! I’m drawn to the green wooden gate.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Candy. I’m usually especially drawn to the green ones. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

Talk to me

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s