Thursday Doors, February 16 2017

Here is the first crop of the doors from our lovely end-of-the-year trip to the region of Goriška Brda, called “Slovenian Tuscany”.

This was one well-researched trip thanks to my knowledgeable relatives.

We drove from the Slovenian coast northwards, past Trieste through Italy toward Gorizia which is a city on the border with Slovenia where its name changes to Nova Gorica. We reentered Slovenia there and continued to the top of Sabotin hill where today’s door journey ends.

This is World War I. territory, and World War II. wasn’t far behind. It is bilingual too, with many Slovenians living across the border. Considering how much they used to fight for the borders, it’s a relief that today one barely notices the change of countries. It made me hope that it stays this way.

What this post lacks doorwise, it makes up with history. It could be argued that history is a door as well, and yet we rarely use it to learn.

Photo: © signature mmm

For Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors challenge.

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22 Comments Add yours

  1. Great selection, Manja. Those reconstructed WW1 trenches must have given you a good idea of how those soldiers felt at the time. Interesting to have them in a Peace Park – hopefully they are good reminders of what war can do, unfortunately those who need reminding never seem to listen.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s correct about never listening, Jean. And I think they build the Peace Park around the trenches on purpose. When I say reconstructed, I should have said restored. The trenches were there to begin with. And thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. How emotive that would be, to stand in the same trench as those poor soldiers.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. It’s quite a bit unsettling but luckily the amazing views of the Soča river valley below and Triglav, the highest Slovenian peak, are there to ground you.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Trench warefare, what a nightmare! Of course, war is nightmare, but those trenches were awful. Thanks for a view of a place I’ve not been.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Janet. It is one of those places where history hits you in the face and you have to breathe deeper.

      Like

  3. bikerchick57 says:

    You have plenty of material here with doors. Thanks for taking us on a tour of the area. Peace Park is so very interesting with the WWI trenches and tunnel. I suppose they put the door on the tunnel so they could keep the enemy out and themselves safe. What do you think?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Mary. I like the name, Peace Park, and then they show us how the war was like. As for that door, I think it’s been put there recently so that visitors don’t roam too deep into the caves where it might not be safe.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. jan says:

    Great view shots! Always great to get a little history with doors!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Jan! In some places history is too thick to ignore.

      Like

  5. I love the one reflecting the tree. Somehow that really caught me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Claudia. It’s also true that I’ve posted a similar one once before… There is me in there with the tree. 🙂

      Like

      1. Oh! I’ll look again, more closely. You know, this is like a fairy story – a magic vision in a door…the passerby (me) sees it…what happens next, I don’t know, as I am not great with plot-plotting, but…adventure?!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Oh, yes, adventure, always. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Dan Antion says:

    I love the red arched doors the best, but these are all beautiful. I really like the gate you featured. Thanks for the tour 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re welcome, Dan! As I must thank my relatives for planning the entire amazing day. There were many of us, not just my Italian, wondering why we had known so little of these places.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. jesh stg says:

    Yes, those borders:) They create some conflicts -even now. Thanks for taking us on this memorial trip! Love the stone surrounding the door in your featured image! Have a great weekend, Manja:)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you; Jesh, for coming over and same to you!

      Like

  8. Norm 2.0 says:

    You hit that magical time of day; the light is just gorgeous in some of these shots.
    The little church is very pretty.
    Those trenches in the peace park are something that needs to be preserved and shown to as many people as possible. It’s astounding how quickly we forget (collectively speaking) the terrible human cost of wars.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Norm! 🙂 It was a very well lit day throughout. I have many more doors from the continuation of the day. But yes, these needed to be shown as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Vicky says:

    Trench warfare, you can’t imagine how terrible it must have been. A lovely pictorial walk through an unknown area for me, thanks for sharing Manja…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, Vicky, you’re very welcome, you do just this all the time as well.

      Liked by 1 person

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