Thursday Doors, March 30 2017

A bit of anniversary and another instalment of doors from “Slovenian Tuscany” which impressed even us who live at the source.

On this day three years ago, for some not quite determined reason (but mostly to show my photos and tell stuff to more than my immediate people), I posted my first ever blog post. It was not your typical happy-go-lucky yay-me tale, but rather told the sad true story of an escaped lynx.

But already the next day it got lighter in tone with tales of August – my month on Crete, my relationship with Peugeots and gender, and how my learning of Italian was proceeding. There was also the quotation below by Tahereh Mafi. I don’t know where I got it but only now I see that she is a young Iranian-American writer. I’d say that she took words out of my mouth, but in reality I believe that in her case this was much more literal.

I spent my life folded between the pages of books. In the absence of human relationships I formed bonds with paper characters. I lived love and loss through stories threaded in history; I experienced adolescence by association. My world is one interwoven web of words, stringing limb to limb, bone to sinew, thoughts and images all together. I am a being comprised of letters, a character created by sentences, a figment of imagination formed through fiction.

Tahereh Mafi, “Shatter Me”

In the meantime I crossed over to this one, my second blog, and here we have it: three years’ worth of words, images, smiles, discoveries, mostly joy, some bitterness, Bestia, amore, family, friends, the sea, boats, animals, towns, Italia, Slovenia, nature, windows, stairs, arches, and of course – doors.

And since it’s Thursday, today we celebrate Norm and his brilliant idea to gather door lovers and their photos in one challenge.

The village Šmartno in Goriška Brda region of Slovenia, called “Slovenian Tuscany” due to its hillocks and wine-making, is a bright example of how prettily an old village can be restored but also, as some of the doors below clearly show, what happens when no restoration takes place.

The combination is such that I think I didn’t stop clicking for a moment. The first part of Šmartno doors can be found here, then, just for a change, here is a nice 6-window post, and for any who might need it, here is the inside of the lovely village church. One more door post from here will appear in a Thursday to come.

I wish to let everybody who has ever spent any amount of time on my blog know how grateful I am for your time. In this day and age it is not a given that anybody hears.

Photo: © signature mmm

For Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors challenge.

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56 Comments Add yours

  1. Judith says:

    There are some beauties in this collection – textures, patterns and quirks that make each picture worth lingering over.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Judith, I’m very glad you see it too, the worthwhileness of each. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Dan Antion says:

    Another fine collection of beautiful doors. I love the worn wooden doors, like the one you featured and the similar one at #42. I also like the panel layout at #47. I always try to figure out the process of making these doors. Happy anniversary!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hehe, Dan, I had to look hard to find #47! I never noticed it had a number. I like it how you look at the details and craftsmanship, whereas I feel the feeling a door gives me. And colours. 🙂 Thank you, I always appreciate your comments to see it from the other side.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dan Antion says:

        I understand the woodworking necessary to making doors and windows, so I always think about it. The craftsmanship is what keeps these old worn doors functional.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. mexploring says:

    Such a great collection – enough to print many postcards! I loved those with the aloe in the pots 🙂
    About the quote, I could find myself in it. I remember how at the age of 20 I exclaimed to myself: “I have known the life only through books – I want to know it through other channels too!”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Mex. I hope you don’t mind me calling you that. I’m Mexi, it figures. 😉 Yeah, other channels, good that they come just in time too. Books are fine but life is life. As for the postcards, I used to play with grandma’s postcards so much as a child. I think it might have rubbed off, that aesthetics. 😀 I miss postcards, nobody is sending them any more. Thank you for your visit!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. mexploring says:

        Oh, you just invented my name – thank you! 🙂 And it seems that we are a family, looking at the names, so funny.
        I love books – but I love life more. Even though books were nicer to me, haha. That playing with postcards definitely influenced you, and I love that kind of pictures! No one sending postcards, really? I see many Russian instabloggers sending and receiving the postcards. Do you want to start postcard flashmob? 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Oh, I believe that if I wished I could find postcard lovers online in great quantities. I was thinking more of my family and friends. I can’t recall when I last got one from a family member. Plenty of emails though. 🙂 And you’re welcome!

        Like

      3. mexploring says:

        That’s true. You can find anything and anyone online 😉 I never was a fan of sending postcards, but I love receiving them. I am sure, you can always start this tradition when you really want it 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Another wonderful collection doors, but I fell in love with #42 with it’s worn wood, and weathered green paint.
    Happy Blogaverssary!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Deborah (and for the RT). Yes, I love this shade of wood too. Funny how there are two so very similar doors in there but not one and the same.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. No, they weren’t the same at all. #42 does it for me. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Norm 2.0 says:

    Sigh…I could get lost for hours (if not days) doorscursioning in a place like this. #50 & 42 are my favorites, but as others have said; a wonderful collection yet again.
    And a happy blog birthday to you !
    😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh yes, this town was really heavy on the door senses, in a good, if slightly overdoored way. Thanks, Norm, couldn’t have done all these doors without you.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Vanessa says:

    Oh, my, so many more wonderful old doors. Hard to choose a favourite…but I like the red door under the staircase. Are those vines or just branches intertwined in the railing?!

    Happy three years of blogging 🙂 I’m glad we ran into one another!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Vanessa, and I share your last thought. 🙂 As for the vines, I had a closer look and it seems they have stuck dry twigs in there on purpose and left them there as a decoration.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. ianbcross says:

    Even though several of these doors are crumbling wrecks, there is a neatness about their surroundings. They look loved and cared for. In contrast, my Delhi doors are neglected. For most Indians personal and domestic hygiene is paramount, but as soon as you enter the public arena, it is no one’s responsibility. Nice posting.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh, Ian, I have not yet experienced anything like your location. It would be a great cultural shock for me but also an eye-opening experience. Maybe one day. Thanks for your comments and your images.

      Like

  8. J Walters says:

    What a door adventure for me, new to Norm’s door challenge (2nd week). Just wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, J, I’m glad you’re enjoying it.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. These are great pictures. Makes me want to travel there just to see the doors.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Little Voice. This entire village is very worthy even if you take all the doors away. And the entire region. And the entire country!

      Like

  10. joey says:

    I love the featured green and the one similar to it, but I feel certain you know which one I love most.
    I’m glad to read you and admire your photos 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh yes, you like those with growth around them. 🙂 Thank you, Joey, very much likewise!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Beautiful piece of writing by Tahereh Mafi, thank you for sharing it, Manja, and thank you for sharing your lovely photographs too. It’s always a pleasure viewing the interesting places (and doors) your camera takes us to.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jean, thank you so much, I’m glad you enjoy coming over. Always good to see you around.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Happy birthday to your blog!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, SMSW. I’m glad I found you quite early on. It’s more fun this way. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m glad too 😊 It IS more fun this way! PS great photos, too

        Liked by 1 person

  13. jesh stg says:

    Wow, you are doing quite well for 3 years of blogging! Lovely doors as always!
    Hope your life is not as lonely as that of the writer you quoted. What she says is so compelling, if I didn’t know she was a writer, I would have written her a note, or made a phone call!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, Jesh, how do you mean doing quite well? Is 3 years a lot or a little? My life was lonely when I was still in primary school and couldn’t wait for my life to begin. At 17 things started to move. Also, I don’t think she suffered much. She had books. And most of all, I don’t know if this is a passage from one of her books or a comment on her real life. In any way, there are much worse childhoods than one with books. And thank you!

      Like

      1. jesh stg says:

        You’re right, there are worse childhoods than lonely with books.
        Three years is seen from my viewpoint short:) So I gave you a compliment:) I took long because I didn’t grow up with the computer and internet, and nice I can ask my kids to help me. I remember well that my daughter almost fell off her chair when I told I was on Facebook:)

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you for the compliment. And I know what you mean: I had my blog before I went on Facebook. 🙂

        Like

  14. fkasara says:

    Happy blogversary!!! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Sara! Can’t believe it’s been three years already. And in two weeks it will be four years since I’ve been living in Italy! 😮

      Liked by 1 person

      1. fkasara says:

        !!! I have to come up with a new term for that…happy italyversary? (!?)

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Heheh, Italyversary sounds just right. And I think everybody should have one. 🙂 Grazie!

        Liked by 1 person

  15. conspicari says:

    Lovely selection of doors, the faded green one’s are my favorites. :>)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Conspicari! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I like the house with the little shutters. Xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, Claudia, I’m not sure which one you mean. Shutters on the windows?

      Like

      1. Yes, right, neatly varnished. Something about them appealed!

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Joanne Sisco says:

    As Judith said at the beginning, all the textures of these various doors is what makes them so compelling. Their crumbling condition should be troubling, but instead there’s beauty in its disrepair.

    … and the words of Tahereh Mafi are haunting. Oh, to be able to write such a memorable passage like this!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Joanne. Compelling textures and haunting words. I’m glad you agree.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. klara says:

    Slovenija (detaljno!) je svakako na mojoj bucket list. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Odlično, Klara, stvarno je lijepa. 🙂 Nije baš velika ali uvijek se može još detalnije od ljudi koji su tamo rođeni a onda putuje svugdje samo ne tamo…

      Like

  19. JT Twissel says:

    Your photographs are always a joy! Love door 42 – I can imagine a sweet older couple living there!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, thanks, Jan. This is a lovely thought. I’m not sure how many and which of these houses are still occupied though.

      Like

  20. Very nice literary blog on your blogging aniversay, Manja and topped off with some great door pics. I like your signature, side-panel door and was surprised that you didn’t post your watermark on the wooden strip above the door. Many happy returns on your blogging!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Gordon. And you’re right: the strip is clearly there for this reason. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Susi Lovell says:

    I love all the peeling plaster and paint, the old wood and broken window! Great photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Susi! I’m glad you like my home country’s doors and windows.

      Like

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