Thursday Doors, May 11 2017

Here is the second part of Ljubljana Graffiti Tour doors.

Since I posted the first part of Slovenia’s capital doors with the now famous “Submarine Door”, I was notified (with a reward “for believing in us when we were smaller”) that the tour operators have changed their name to Ljubljana Alternative Tours, diversified and started to charge for some of their tours. More info on their new website. 

I fear that this is starting to happen all over Ljubljana in one way or another, so come over while it’s still fun and if not free, at least relatively affordable.

The last part of this tour, the doors of the astonishing Metelkova City, I showed you already on a previous Thursday.

Photo: © signature mmm

For Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors challenge.

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51 Comments Add yours

  1. bikerchick57 says:

    I love the door with the fishes. Reminds me of Nemo!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Mary. 🙂 But… are they fish or chickens? 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. bikerchick57 says:

        You are correct, they are chickens. This is what happens when I try to read posts on my phone!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. What a name for a hostel ‘Sleeping Beauty’ – love it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Jean. I guess a prince cannot spend the night there: if you let them sleep for ages, they get rich. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Ishita says:

    Beautiful city!! I hope to return to your country someday

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Ishita. 🙂 I hope you do.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Joanne Sisco says:

    My favourite is #66. It’s not only a beautiful door, but I like the trio of guardian angels 🙂
    I’m starting to think that Ljubljana must be the graffiti capital of the world!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Joanne. Ljubljana is a grand mixture. It doesn’t have many big street art murals though as you can see in some places.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. mexploring says:

    wow, almost ghetto in some pics 🙂
    I love the use of Kyrillic alphabet, reminds me of my mother tongue, Russian 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This is in the centre of the city. 🙂 Might seem ghetto but is rather safe, I believe. This is a rare place in the Slovenia where you can see the Cyrillic alphabet. It is used by Serbians and Macedonians. Back in Yugoslavia, we in Slovenia used to learn it one year in primary school. I can read it since I liked reading some Serbian newspapers and practised this way. No Russian though… Except haruoša paguoda. 😀 (Ok, and cpaciba. 😀 :D)

      Liked by 1 person

      1. mexploring says:

        It looks safe and peaceful. I hope to visit it soon, it seems to be a very beautiful city.
        Thank you for making it clear. I mix it all up 🙂 I know I know, this sounds awful for you, but it is difficult to make the differences between so many countries. Before you go there. After being twice in Croatia I start to figure out the former Yugoslavia geography 🙂
        Haha, impressed by your Russian. There are definitely many common words, as I discover it constantly in Croatian. Makes me so proud of being a Slavic person)))

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Hehe, oh yes, wouldn’t change the Slav in me. Are you kidding? Not sounding awful at all, I wonder how anybody from the outside gets anything right about the Balkans at all. And please don’t ask me anything about any former Soviet republics. 😮 Anyway, I hope you get to Slovenia one day. It’s tiny but compact and varied.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. mexploring says:

        Right, neither would I. It is such a rich heritage! Lol, once I had to do the quiz on European countries when you have to press right location when you read the name. And fast as the time was measured. Omg, Serbia got me stuck, I could never find it (I was guessing by hitting every spot I didn’t recognize 😆). So yes, no control over Balkans😂 Soviet republics though is my speciality))) isn’t it funny to have such a history and puzzle everyone around us? 🤓

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Hihih, quite fun indeed. 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  6. dennyho says:

    The Hostel Sleeping Beauty door is a ‘beauty’! So Manja, the graffiti seems to be everywhere in this city. Is it celebrated and considered art or unwanted as with the lady who lives behind the gate? Thanks for explaining.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Denny. Well, I don’t live there anymore for 4 years but I guess street art scene in on the rise in cities everywhere, and is very alive in Ljubljana. For example, during the tour they showed us some cameras and pristine walls on which cameras focus, but walls full of graffiti all around :D. I guess nobody is really fighting it, except certain property owners, I’m sure. Mind you – these are all from the same street, more or less. It’s not like that everywhere.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. dennyho says:

        Thx Manja!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Vanessa says:

    Oh, my. So many gems here, but I do love a dingy purple door as the first impression of the “Sleeping Beauty” hostel.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Vanessa. 🙂 I wonder if the owners leave it in this state on purpose…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Vanessa says:

        It’s working!

        Liked by 1 person

  8. So bright and cheerful. I love that purple door, but just a bit of paint would really make it great. 🙂

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Janet. I wonder what might happen to that door if it was too glossy. 😉

      Like

  9. conspicari says:

    Lovely set of doors, like No.39 and Sleeping Beauty. :>)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Conspicari. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Vicky says:

    Wonderful diversity, colour and graffiti and some lovely doors. Thanks for the walk-about, what a fun place!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Vicky. This area is truly the diversity capital of Slovenia.

      Like

  11. I got a giggle out of Hostel Sleeping Beauty. What Prince would want to kiss her? 🙂

    Loved the selection this week!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Deborah. Luckily there are princes of all kinds. 😉 I hope you’re having an excellent day all around. I left you a furry friend greeting on Twitter. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Norm 2.0 says:

    I`m another one who would like to splash a fresh coat of paint on that hostel door 😀
    Terrific collection with some fun graffiti and an eclectic mix of doors 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Norm. Who knows what a new coat could make graffiti artists do… For example, write “New coat?” on it. I’ve seen it done… 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Dan Antion says:

    Some of the graffiti is nice, some should be power-washed away and I’ll add my hat to the paint the hostel door chants. I love the wooden door at 66 – of course, you knew that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Dan. It’s a take it or leave it kind of place. I left, but always love coming back. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  14. jesh stg says:

    Your featured door and window is very tastefully decorated. I see that Russian lettering is still there at the Serbian Club..You probably also know (at least some) Russian? I remember so well that the kids of our friends in the 70ties in Eastern Germany, were only allowed to take English, if they had a perfect grad in Russian.
    Oh, and the wine red door with the pillars next to it is beautiful too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you approve of the featured door, Jesh, I like the art of it too. This lettering is not just Russian, but at least also Serbian and Macedonian. Curious info about Eastern Germany, I never knew anybody from there. Russian is a Slavic language like Slovenian but I don’t understand much. I was once trying to learn Russian by myself, from an old book, but only got till Lesson 3. 🙂 I can still read Cyrillic though, since we were learning it for one year in primary school when Slovenia was still in Yugoslavia and I was 12 or so.

      Like

      1. jesh stg says:

        Am Dutch, but in the time Communism had taken over we lived together for a year in W-Berlin and my oldest daughter was born there (hubby had already lived there for the 2 previous years, and did missions work in Eastern Eur.) – that explains my interest in Eastern Europe, because we visited people in these countries (not staying over night, because that would bring them in trouble). So, I guess, Russian as a language was not anymore mandatory in school, when you were in school…
        Love cultures (my minor was in anthropology), so don’t mind me asking all these questions:)

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Well, I was born after Tito said No to Stalin and the non-alignment movement was formed in 1956 (neither NATO nor Warsaw Pact), of which Yugoslavia was a founding member. I had a rather special growing-up. We were able to travel everywhere we wished, just with a limited amount of money and we were forbidden to bring in the country expensive things without paying a huge customs fee. So we all smuggled. 😀 But I’m quite sure my parents didn’t have Russian in school either.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. jesh stg says:

        Recalling from memory, hubby traveling more in East Eur. than I – common people living in East Germany, Poland, Hungary, Rumania, Bulgaria, Albania, and the USSR were not able to travel in non-Eastern countries (called “the West”) in the 70-80ties until the Berlin Wall “fell” in 1989. And coming from the “West” it took months to get a visa to enter these countries to go on “vacation.” So, I guess Yugoslavia was not part of the Iron Curtain countries then. All so interesting, knowing we are part of history:)

        Liked by 2 people

  15. Wow! Nice finds, Manja! I think the person inside of door 39 was shooting your photo while you photographed that door 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha, well spotted, Gordon. Check out the cap on her!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. scooj says:

    Great doors and some good graffiti too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Scooj. I don’t know much about it despite taking the tour, but I do have some wall art photos for another post.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. scooj says:

        I look forward to it.

        Liked by 1 person

  17. It is always nice to find a post and a blog that celebrates the architecture of doorways! I am often asked why I am taking photographs of doorways when on holidays! Some people just don’t get it, or appreciate the beauty and unique features they have! I look forward to reading more of your blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Amanda, for your words and the follow. If you like doors, you’ve come to the right place. I’ve been taking part in Norm’s Thursday Doors challenge for two years now and only missed a few Thursdays early on. That is a lot of doors. I don’t remember seeing your doors yet, I hope you post some for the challenge too. I see that you have Proverbial Thursdays. Maybe you can join them into Proverbial Thursday Doors. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Proverbial Thursday Doors? That does sound like a challenge. I will see what I can do. Great idea Manja. I think the doors challenge I used to participate in was at a blog called The Legion of Door Whores. Before I found that blog I was contemplating starting a door challenge of my own to pair with A Lingering Look at Windows Blog posting! So , you can see that I have been a fan of doors for a while: https://forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com/2014/08/16/a-very-danish-door/

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Excellent! This ‘Door Whores’ challenge was a bit before my time. What a terrible name even though this is exactly what we are. 😀 When I found Norm’s challenge (the link is at the end of my post), I immediately thought this was just right for me. So many great doors there on a weekly basis. Most welcome!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I have had a quick look already at Norm’s challenge and would love to have an excuse to post some more of my door photographs. I will try to remember to add a pingback to you for introducing me, when I join.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Ah, that’s nice, but no problem if you forget, just remember to paste the link to your post in the area where links are gathered. It is marked by the blue frog. 🙂 You will see it every Thursday at the end of Norm’s post.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Thanks Manja! I will do that!

        Liked by 1 person

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