Thursday Doors, June 1 2017

Today is the day to reminisce and look at the doors through which we shall all pass one day.

There will not be as many doors as is the Norm (;) unless you think of each grave as a door, and probably we should.

This cemetery of Talamone is another example of how serene, almost cheerful a cemetery can be. And it’s not just because of the sea view. There is something about the way Catholics treat death.

In the meantime, relatives are gathered in another cemetery, in Slovenia, at the grave of my paternal grandmother’s sister, her youngest sibling and the last of them to say goodbye, who will be buried today.

She lived on a farm close to Maribor, and I liked to visit her and her husband very much when little. I drove the tractor there (the word I couldn’t pronounce – I called it “tlaclot”), fraternised with the dogs, rode the chicken (hm…) and observed the busy life on a farm.

And to close with a celebration: my mother’s mother was born on this day. I cannot even imagine how happy she would be to visit me in Italy. I have a hunch that the first thing she’d do is take me to the opera.

Here she is holding me in the dad’s photo I keep showing because I don’t have many here. It was taken next to the house where my uncle still lives, grows lettuce, green beans and radishes, and kindly lets us use his garden for card tournaments (and everything else).

Photo: BM

I love it how happy they all look. Mom is so young and beautiful, her father has this satisfied smirk that I sometimes see in the mirror, uncle looks like a rock star, great-grandmother I barely remember, and grandmother is just as cheerful and cheeky as she always was. Just I, with my mother’s eyes, am not so sure yet what this life is all about.

Here is the cemetery that called me from the road. Actually the old church did. I could here it whisper: “I’ve got some doors for you.” Not a shabby place for eternal rest.

And for some silliness, here is another post with Talamone doors.

Photo: © signature mmm (except b&w)

For Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors challenge.

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44 Comments Add yours

    1. Thank you, Joseph. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  1. These are just beautiful photos! I especially like the way you took the photo of Jesus from the back and all the photos of the doors through metal openings!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Cady! 🙂 It could be a great setting for a detective story, agreed?

      Like

      1. Oh it would be perfect!!!! Are you going to write one?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Haha, who knows? 🙂 No plans yet…

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Well get on that girl! It would be awesome!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Great series of photos, especially the Jesus and the little Manja one. 🙂
    btw, how do you call that day? I hope I did understand it well… …I’m catholic and we use to do a special care of the graves for ‘All Saints’ day on 1st of November.
    cheers, Markus

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, no, no, Markus, obviously I wasn’t clear enough: this is not a special day for anybody else, just me, because it’s my grandma’s birthday and another relative’s funeral today. But I’m not Catholic or anything else, so I wouldn’t know anyway. 🙂 And thank you!

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      1. ..oops, sorry for the missunderstanding. So I can call my relatives back and we can spend the day home. 🙂
        …’or anything else’ sounds funny. 🙂 “Are you catholic?” “No, sorry, I’m anything else!” 🙂
        ..like “Would you like to spend a day with… A) Markus… ” “B)!!! B)!!! B)!!!!…” 🙂 😀

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Hihihi, I meant to say I’m not a member of any religious group. Spending the day with Markus is always a great choice, I’m sure. 😀

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      3. 🙂 🙂

        sorry, I didn’t wanted to make fun of it.. ..but it sounds funny in a way.

        btw, it’s interesting how the rutuals vary. In Germany the code of behaviour on a graveyard is a kind strict. Not that.. ..but in a way. When we went in Russia for my wifes grandmother 100 aniversary to celebrate it at her grave, my mom in law brought candies and tea which we drank and ate and spread the rest over the grave to share with her. That was surprisng and… ..nice! And I like on russians graveyards, that almost every grave got a tiny table and chair where you can sit and talk. So nice and relaxed.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. On my blog you can always make fun of anything you wish. 🙂 I like fun! As for sitting at the cemetery – there are some benches around in Slovenian cemeteries but we never sit, I don’t know why not. Russian way sounds like a lovely way to celebrate and remember.

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      5. ..hhmm, maybe a good idea to capture a photo series of a russian cementary. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Joanne Sisco says:

    Cemeteries in different countries have a different look and atmosphere about them. However this is the first time I’ve seen a burial ground in Italy. The only ones I’ve seen before were all above ground “condo” style.
    This one is exceptionally beautiful!

    I hope you have a special day remembering your great-grandmother on her birthday and your great-aunt on her farewell day.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Joanne. 🙂 I’ve seen three cemeteries here in Italy so far and all have knocked me off my feet. Italians cannot hide life, even in death. It’s my grandmother’s birthday, not great-grandmother’s – just to make clear.

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      1. Joanne Sisco says:

        oops – I got carried away with the generations 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  4. ianbcross says:

    Just beautiful. How much decoration can a door take?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Ian. Depends what kind of decoration we’re talking about… This seems kind of perfect to me.

      Like

  5. Pistachios says:

    That’s such a lovely family photo! I really like the descriptions you gave everyone, including yourself 😉

    Beautifully elaborate doors this week! Seems like a very awe-inspiring place. I tend to find cemeteries profoundly peaceful. It’s great seeing how well-kept this one is, and how there are so many fresh flowers on/around the graves.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Pistachios, I’m glad it spoke to you what I say about my family. 🙂 I don’t know if they did any location-shooting around here, but it’s just the place for films and photographs. As for fresh flowers – I’d guess most of them are plastic… Italians have nothing against them.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Pistachios says:

        Ahh ok. They still look as good as the real thing!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. joey says:

    So incredible! I love the featured door and the those that echo its style! Just amazingly beautiful in the intricacy of their details! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Joey, I fell in love with this presentation too. Italy – always a surprise!

      Like

  7. Dan Antion says:

    You have a great collection of doors here. I like the photo with the three doors where one is open and one needs a little TLC. I also like all the iron work.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Dan. You show every week that TLC is never far from your mind. Good man. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dan Antion says:

        Thanks. I just hate to see older doors fall into a state where replacing them is so much less expensive than repairing them.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. carol1945 says:

    First of all, I appreciate your analogy (or is the right word metaphor?) for doors– the grave being the last door we enter. I love cemeteries and I never thought it could be related to being raised Catholic. When I travel, it is one of my favorite places to visit in any town. I like thinking about the people down in the ground, and what their stories must be. I really like your blog, the way you think, and the photos you post. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you truly, Carol. 🙂 This is why we do it, I suppose, to stir such sensations and comments. Always welcome.

      Like

  9. JT Twissel says:

    Such fancy ironwork. What a lovely site for a cemetery.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Jan. Agreed.

      Like

  10. Wow. That’s quite an ornate church and doors! What a lovely and serene cemetery and the view of the sea is the icing on the cake..

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Donna. It was not possible to enter the church, that would be amazing. The sea made up for it.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Norm 2.0 says:

    Even here, Catholic cemeteries go all out when it come to ornate decor and opulence, so I’m not surprised to see this kind of beauty from the ones in Italy. And oh my what a location!
    I loved the old family photo and Happy Birthday to Grandma 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Norm. I really don’t like artificial flowers as such but all together is somehow… organic. Right. Like a living room. Here people continue to be alive even in death. And cin cin for Grandmas.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Lovely photos, Manja, especially the family one, you look so cute in it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hehe, thanks, Jean. Not to mention very blonde!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. dennyho says:

    Manja, this post is lovely, thoughtful, romantic…I’ve never seen such doors as these in a cemetery. You called the graves ‘doors’ and though I’ve never thoughts of them as such I always will from this point forward. I am comforted by this profound description – thank you for this wonderful post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ah, thank you so much, Denny! 🙂 I’m so glad it spoke to you.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Vicky says:

    So nice, Manja..Death talk is so awkward but is an inevitable destination.It is interesting how cultures deal with it and how everyone copes with it. Elaborate expense seems to be to fairly typical in some cultures and I do find it fascinating. Your post is lovely in respect and extremely interesting for the view on the elaborate construction for mourning….

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Vicky, I’m glad you found it interesting. Generally I’m not a fan of cemeteries at all, but Italy is changing things as Italy does. 🙂

      Like

  15. dweezer19 says:

    Oh how I love wandering through cemeteries. What beautiful doors. Some folks lie more extravagantly in death than they managed in life I think. Me, I shall be dust in the wind.
    What a beautiful family portrait. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! Here in Italy cemeteries are not like anywhere I’ve been. Such peace and serenity, but not in a morbid way. Dust in the wind is the way to be. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. dweezer19 says:

    That is similsr to the New Orleans cemetaeries in Louisiana. Almost all above ground ornate crypts. A lot of history there.

    Liked by 1 person

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