Thursday Doors, November 30 2017

Today we return to Piran in Slovenia to have a look at some doors that may or may not come with people attached.

First, one image with no people. Not yet. Imagine all the various doors in these tight little streets.

And now a slow progression through pairs of doors with and without human company until we reach the pinnacle: the Local. Click on the first photo to follow the story in the gallery.

Photo: © signature mmm

For Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors challenge.

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47 Comments Add yours

    1. Thank you, Haley. Welcome to my blog!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Dan Antion says:

    Lovely collection of doors, Manja, but I’m sticking with the meandering stone path in the fist photo. I would love to walk there.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Dan. I wish you would, that we all would together. Imagine a nice little door-lover conference here.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. dweezer19 says:

    Always such lovely doors. I agree with Dan.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Cheryl. See what I replied to him – a paradise setting for a door-lovers’ conference. 🙂

      Like

  3. Helen Bushe says:

    These are all great doors. It’s so long ago that I went to Piran that I wasn’t in the habit of photographing doors. It was in the days of 24 or 36-frame films and you had to pay for every print! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ohhh, Helen, this is one of the best examples of progress being not so bad after all. 🙂 I hope you return! Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Missed the doors 🚪 😂 we’ll be gone but the doors still be there…:))

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Well, well, RayNot is back! Great to see you! Just very recently I went to your blog to see if there is any news. And you’re so right: doors will outlive us all and tell the story of crazy people taking their photos.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Joanne Sisco says:

    The 2nd photo fooled me. At first I thought it was a white stripe painted through the door and up the building. It took me a second to realize it was a band of sunlight.

    However my favourite is the building with the blue doors, shutters, and women’s heads over the 2nd floor windows. I agree that there has to be a story to that building.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Joanne. If I was a good girl blogger, I would investigate, wouldn’t I…

      Like

      1. Joanne Sisco says:

        hehehe! I know the feeling … sometimes I’m just happy to live with the mystery 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Ellen Hawley says:

    Ah, Piran: the patron saint of Cornwall. You did tell me a good long time ago.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heheh, Ellen, I did, didn’t I. I probably told you about Tamar too. Here’s to us switching places for a while and see for ourselves what is what. But not at the same time! I wish to see you too! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ellen Hawley says:

        I don’t think you did mention Tamar. Is it also a river?

        At the moment, I’m staying put but if you’re over this way I’ll put the kettle on.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Just reading your piece of lasagna. “Tamar” is the name of a picture-postcard valley under the Alps in Slovenia, especially pretty in the snow. But a tamar is also a word denoting a place where animals are kept, like a pen.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. charlotteash says:

    I love the narrow, twisted streets. I want to go there! The doors are lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, yes, Charlotte, come! And then I’ll come to New Orleans. YEahh!!! Imagine the doors there!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Duke Miller says:

    Hi MMM,

    What am I to make of all these doors? What is a “door challenge”? For me, it is imagining what is going on behind the doors. That is what interests me. Also the history of the doors. Who has gone in and out of the doors? Some were bad, and others good. Some might have been killers, while others were lovers. Old people, young, the sick and the dying, the happy and the sad, on and on it goes, but always we are led back to a door. Janus…did you know the Bangladeshis bury placenta in front of doorsteps? I was trying to get a sales contract with a Parisian cosmetics maker. The idea was they would buy the placenta from certain select Bangladeshi families. Some of those firms used to use placenta in their products. Don’t know if that is still true or not. People thought I was nuts, but it seemed better than letting families starve to death. Anyway, nice photos. Thanks. Duke

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Duke, for what might be the most atypical Thursday Doors comment. This is how it is: we all make of doors exactly what we wish. Some investigate their history, some study their craftsmanship, some knock on them and run (well… not me!), but we all in some way acknowledge that they have been here much longer than we have and have seen plenty. Placenta, now that is another matter. I don’t go around enough to have an opinion on that. Be as it may – every Thursday there have been doors and will continue to do so. The least we can do, frankly. Always good to see you around.

      Like

  9. That’s a beautiful collection, not only of doors, but of the things around them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, I. J. Yes, I usually prefer to capture the entire scene surrounding a door, not just the door as such, even though sometimes the door is the only interesting item.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Susanne says:

    And then, after reading MMM’s post, she scurried through the door to the WWW and searched for the meaning of the word “Minorite” knowing it was probably not a derivative of Marmite. Lo! The Book of St. Wikipedia revealed the truth. Praise be!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hahha, Susanne, sometimes I assume wrongly. I assumed that the entire (Christian) world knew this word but when I asked amore, he was looking at me strangely. As if ‘little friars’ or what is the synonym sounds any more logical. 😀 To me, this kind of vocabulary is a bit of a black hole. I didn’t even know where the Pope has his summer residence or I’d nail the 10th, all-important, “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire question” and who knows where I’d be now. (Really. On national TV.) Damn Castel Gandolfo.

      Like

      1. Susanne says:

        The Pope has a summer home? You’re miles ahead of me!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Hahha. Which only means that he must have also a winter chalet.

        Like

  11. What a delightful walk! I’d really love to see a door with a person attached, though. 🙂 Happy Thursday.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hihih, Janet, that was not the greatest word selection, was it. Thank you!

      Like

  12. JT Twissel says:

    Did you have to get up really early to get a shot of the alleyway without people? Love those staircase pics – they’re not too straight but that makes them more interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jan, I had a look, the photo was taken at 4.30 pm, in July! So I guess these streets don’t get very crowded at all times in the summer. More people are on the waterfront. There are so many little streets and stairs that you can easily find peace and quiet. Not straight is right.

      Like

  13. Norm 2.0 says:

    Lovely doors as always. The colour of the first blue ones really pops.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Norm. That one seems newly painted. Not all are.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. jesh stg says:

    My favorite view of all these beautiful ones is the first one, Manja! It also reminds me of all the climbing one does in the Mediterranean streets:) And you’re not afraid of cobwebs!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s true, Jesh, climbing is what you do there. Good exercise, but a bit hot for it in the summer. Thank you!

      Like

      1. jesh stg says:

        I know, what you mean when I am in one of these Mediterranean countries, I often think why we didn’t go earlier in the year when it’s cooler, because I’m not one for laying on the beach anyway!

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Candy says:

    Great doors with so much character!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. mexploring says:

    That reminds me of my beloved Rovinj. I especially loved the house with blue shades and doors. I would love living in one like that 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh yes, Mex, Rovinj is just down the road from Piran as it were. Well, 80 km and another country. I haven’t been there with my camera yet… Good idea. Thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. mexploring says:

        Hehe, 80 km and another country – this is why I love Europe! A new country every couple of hundreds km 😆😆 Rovinj is such an enchanting town, totally recommend (bc I am in love with that place).

        Liked by 1 person

  17. awtytravels says:

    Hey, I see cobwebs on one of them doors! I’ve started a fashion, I’m a trend setter!

    Jokes aside, hello Piran! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Fabrizio! I took these in July but yes, I thought of your last week’s photo when I saw the cobwebs. Any doors where you’re at?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. awtytravels says:

        Not much I’m afraid! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Wasn’t 42 also the answer to what is the meaning of life? 😉 Maybe it’s behind that door

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, SMSW, this is what I was thinking. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

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